Feed Your Horse The Best: Whole Live Nutritious Food Part 4

Whole Food 4: Herbs and More

In our final month of whole foods, let’s talk about a few herbs and “other” foods that are packed full of nutrition.

hawthorneHawthorn Berries are high in antioxidants.  They contain the flavonoids such as quercitin, and oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs)- the same antioxidants found in grapes.  In Europe, they are used as a heart tonic and to treat circulatory and heart disorders.

 

 

 

 

rasp leafRed Raspberry Leaf is high in vitamin C, magnesium, potassium, iron and vitamin B.  Most horse people are familiar with raspberry leaf as a uterine relaxant and it’s suggested use for mares when “in heat”.  Some horse owners have reported limited success with using raspberry for those reasons.  I advise horse owners to tailor a herbal prescription to their individual horse’s needs and not just rely on over the counter preparations.

 

 

 

pollenBee Pollen is another excellent source of amino acids.  Bee pollen is considered a super food that interestingly we can’t artificially produce.  It is full of vitamin and minerals and many have acclaimed it’s super powers.  My only concern is the plight of the honey bee.  They are dying out fast and while scientist know of multiple causes, there seems to be little hope for these great pollinators.

 

 

noniNoni Fruit has a vast array of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and phytonutrients.  Noni fruit is thought to be a antioxidant, anti inflammatory, analgesic and an antibacterial.

 

 

 

 

rosehipRosehips are a rich source of vitamin C but also contain vitamin A, B and K.

 

 

 

 

So that completes our list, although I wouldn’t say it’s complete.  I just wanted to give you a sample of the many foods available that pack a punch in nutrition.  Supplementing our horses doesn’t require synthetic or man made vitamins and minerals that congest and clog our horses systems up.  Not only do we over supplement our horses with vitamins and minerals but many of the synthetics are not utilized by the body and are actually harmful.  Hopefully this list gave you a place to start in providing a rich source of vitamins and minerals to your horse without having to pay the expensive price tag on processed supplements.

Remember this information is not to replace veterinary advice or care.  Always consult a equine nutritionist when changing your horses diet.

Don’t forget to contact me if you’d like a topic covered in a future blog.  Until next time,

Rebecca

 

 

 

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