Tag: raw food

 

Feed Your Horse The Best: Whole Live Nutritious Foods Part 3

Whole Foods 3: Seeds and Such

Last month we talked about some great whole foods that are not only packed with nutrition but are treats our horses love to eat.  Today I want to talk about seeds and some other dried foods that are great additions to an equine supplement you are attempting to make or looking to buy.  Check these out…

nutr yeast Nutritional Yeast is an excellent source of amino acids, B vitamins and provides the compounds beta-1,3 glucan, trehalose, mannan and glutathione, which are associated with enhanced immunity, reduced cholesterol levels and cancer prevention. Nutritional yeast also has the minerals iron, selenium and zinc.  Note that it has been heated and deactivated so there isn’t any active yeast.  (This is especially important for people who add it to their diet because it won’t cause or aggravate any candida growth.)  You will find this listed in holistic supplements for horses and therefore is something you should know about.

 

 

kelpKelp (a nutritional seaweed) is an excellent mineral supplement containing most of the trace minerals and some ultra trace minerals.  It also contains proteins and the vitamins A,B, C, D, E and K making it a great nutritional supplement.  Kelp also contains a biological available form of calcium and iodine.  Your source for kelp is important as some products are mislabeled and some products have toxic metals in them.  It helps to do a little research on the source of kelp before you feed it to yourself or your horse.

 

 

 

spirulinaSpirulina (a bluegreen algae) is known to be a good source of protein, carotenoids, iron and minerals.  Loaded with antioxidants, spirulina, is being researched for it’s role in immune function, cleansing out toxins and fighting diseases such as cancer.

 

 

 

 

hempHemp Seeds are a great source of protein and amino acids, essential fatty acids and phytonutrients.  Similar to flax seeds, hemp seeds are high in omega 3 fatty acids but additionally provides significant amounts of the more rare ‘super’ polyunsaturated fatty acids, notably gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA). Supplementation with GLA and SDA appears to alleviate the symptoms of atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases.

 

 

Flax Seeds. please read my previous article about the benefits of flax seeds by clicking here.

chiaChia Seeds.  According to Mountain Rose Herbs they contain “Essential fatty acids alpha-linolenic and linoleic acid, mucin, strontium, 30% protein, Vitamins A, B, E, and D, and minerals including calcium, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur, iron, iodine, copper, zinc, sodium, magnesium, manganese, niacin, thiamine, silicon, and anti-oxidants.”  They are concentrated little powerhouses of nutrition.  Unlike flax seeds, chia seeds are digested and do not need to be ground.

 

 

pumpkinPumpkin seeds are also packed with omega 3 fatty acids.  They are a good source of magnesium and zinc.  Studies show they help improve insulin regulation and lower inflammation in the body.  In addition, pumpkin seeds are a good source of tryptophan which the body uses to make serotonin.

 

 

 

sunflowerSunflower seeds are high in vitamin E.  The antioxidant properties of vitamin E are known to fight numerous diseases from asthma to arthritis.  They are also a good source of magnesium and selenium.

 

 

 

sesameSesame Seeds.  The World’s Healthiest Foods says “Not only are sesame seeds an excellent source of copper and a very good source of manganese, but they are also a good source of calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, molybdenum, selenium, and dietary fiber.”

 

 

 

It’s amazing how these little seeds can have such nutritional value and therefore great disease fighting and health promoting properties.  It makes me not only want to include them into my horses diet but also my own.

Feed Your Horse The Best: Whole Live Nutritious Foods Part 2

Whole Foods 2: Fresh Foods

Last time we talked about why whole foods are so great for your horse and the downsides of feeding processed foods.  If you haven’t read that article, you can find it here.  Today, let’s review some edible fresh foods for horses and what nutrients they have in them.  While some of these you may already give to your horse, I bet some you never thought of.  I want to mention that when introducing new foods proceed slowly as to not upset your horses digestive system.  In addition, realize that not all foods will be palatable to your individual horse.

carrots

Carrots are rich in beta carotene which converts into retinol, the most usable vitamin A for the body.  It is recommended that horses get between 24,000 & 50,000 IU per day.  1 cup of carrots has about 18,000 IU.  Green grass has vitamin A but in winter horses can easily become deficient because stored hay looses it’s vitamin content pretty quickly.  Carrots also contain vitamin K, C, E, B1,, B2, B3, B6, potassium, folate, copper, phosphorous, pantothenic acid and manganese.

 

 

applesApples contain polyphenols which are not only a great source of antioxidants but also have been shown to reduce blood sugar.  Apparently, the apple slows down carbohydrate digestion and reduces glucose absorption.  In human research, apples are good for the cardiovascular system, anti-cancer and anti-asthma.  Apples are a good source of vitamin C.

 

 

 

peasPeas are great antioxidants and anti-inflammatory.  They contain vitamin K, C, B1, B2, B3, B6, folate, copper, manganese, zinc, potassium, magnesium, iron and choline.

 

 

 

 

pumpkinsPumpkin reportedly safe to offer your horses.  I’ve never tried it but might this coming fall and see what they do.  I do feed pumpkin seeds and that we will cover in the future under seeds and such.  Pumpkin is high in vitamin A, B, antioxidants and many minerals.  Might be worth a try!

Mango pieces can be fed to your horse but NOT the pit/seed. Mangos are another good source of vitamin C and A.

 

 

 

bananasBananas are a great source of potassium but also manganese, biotin, copper, vitamin C, and B6.  The most antioxidants are from very ripe bananas and horses are happy to gobble them up.

 

 

 

 

wheat grassWheat Grass is like a horse superfood.  I grow this indoors during the winter or early spring to give my horses a special treat.  It’s full of minerals like iron, zinc, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, sodium and selenium.  Vitamins in wheatgrass include A, C, E, and several B vitamins. The most prevalent vitamin in wheatgrass is pantothenic acid.

Fresh herbs are a great addition to your horses diet.  Again these can be grown inside and offered during the winter months when it’s hard for horses to get anything fresh.  Although the discussion of herbs for your horse is beyond this blog here is a list of some herbs you can try: chamomile, red clover, calendula or thyme.

There are other vegetables and fruit (without pits) that supposedly are safe to feed your horse, I’ve just never tried them.  Obviously this information is not to replace veterinary care and I cannot be held liable for this information.  Just saying…

 

 

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