Is Your Practitioner Competitive?

I was in the barn.  Quietly working on a client’s horse.  Two women were having a conversation down the isle.  I wasn’t trying to eaves drop but I couldn’t help but over hear.  “Susan is great, she has gone to Fill In The Blank School and my horses are always better after they see her.  She’s only good for massage though.  If you need anything else, you better try Jeramiah” said the one lady.  “Oh really” said the other, “My friend told me that Jeremiah was better at massage and to see Dr. Nix for other body work”.  “She said that Susan was not very educated.”  “I heard that Kathy was great at energy work although you can’t tell what she is doing.”  So on and so forth.

 

First, I know that there are good and bad trainers, good and bad therapist and good and bad farriers.  While I may have an opinion about another practitioner’s work, I keep it to myself.  In reality, no one person is perfect.  You have to find what works for you.  Honestly, most people making the judgements about a particular practitioner being good or bad usually don’t even know enough to make that decision anyhow.  Some practitioners are really good and know a lot but aren’t good at expressing it.  Some practitioners don’t know as much but have a great bedside manner.  Even others are great with horses and not with people.  You get the drift?

 

The women meant well and were only trying to share their experiences.  However, I know each of these practitioners and while it is true that each has their strengths and weaknesses, they all are good.  Public perception is the key to having a good business in the horse world.  As we know, the public can be quite fickle in how they make “rational” judgement.  In fact, there are books written on how little we actually remember the facts when things happen.  Usually we remember how we felt.  Why am I saying this?  To discredit these women… no.  To make people sound like flakes…no.  Just to open our eyes that sometimes we make decisions and we just aren’t qualified to do so.

 

Where Am I Leading You?

There is something you don’t realize.  Each practitioner out there doing bodywork or energy work is tapping into the same universal life force (or qi) to help your horse.  Each one has their twist/name/language but that is only where it differs.  How do I know this?  Let me explain.  Let’s start with definitions.

Massage: using manual techniques to release restrictions in muscles, fascia and soft tissue.

Chiropractic: using manual techniques to re-align structures such as joints and the spinal column.

Acupuncturist: using needles to regulate the qi of the body to allow the horse to heal itself.

Craniosacral Therapist: using their hands to feel changes in the craniosacral rythym and release restrictions.

Reiki Practitioner: using their hands to channel the universal qi to facilitate healing

QiGong Therapist: another type of energy work based on chinese medicine.

And so on…

Each of these modalities uses some type of touch or hand work to interact with the energy of the horse.  It is all energy work.  I don’t believe in splitting hairs here.  You can take a practitioner from each school and ask them to evaluate your horse.  They will all find the same thing but will describe it differently based on their education.  They will all be right and they all can help.  Anyone who tells you any differently is being competitive!

I speak from experience.  I do acupuncture, acupressure, craniosacral therapy, massage and reiki.  I cannot tell you where one begins and one ends.  Once I put my hands on the horse, I use all those modalities to give me feedback about the horse and use all those modalities to facilitate the horse healing itself.  I could describe what I feel either from an acupuncturists school of thought, a CST practitioners language, a massage therapist vocabulary or a reiki practitioners consciousness.  While there are many differences in each of these modalities and each of them takes many years of learning and practice to master, they all deal with the universal life force that exists in every living animal.

So next time you try and decide what modality is best, stop trying to kid yourself.  Unless you are a master of all, you won’t really know.  Give each practitioner a chance to help your horse.  And dismiss any practitioner that tries to tell you why they are best.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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